Why did you choose your specialty?

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Bodie_ECV64

New member
Oct 6, 2020
1
0
Woah, no no no no no no. You' not serious.....Oh no......OMG this is soooooooooo coooooooooooool!!!!!!!!!!

I need to get my General License...

I've always wanted to talk to other people over the air and have my own little HAM radio. I just don't know anyone to talk with. No one I know does anything with HAMs or radio waves! BUT THEY"RE SOO COOOL!
73s
 

vvbudh

Active member
Oct 1, 2020
38
11
That's also super cool Philip. I've liked dabbling with electricity and know a little bit from my uncle who's an electrician/jack of all trades. It never really stuck though...but reloading did.

The Do it yourself computing, for the Elliott, that's an interesting idea. I'm impressed that they would have courses to teach their customers how to program.

I'm glad this community is well stocked with experienced and knowledgeable people too. One day I'll be able to say something impressive!
 
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iefbr14

Member
Oct 12, 2020
11
1
I ended up in IT by accident. Literally... I had been working as a studio tech for a television network and was involved in a bad accident which left me too damaged to achieve my dream of eventually becoming a professional cameraman. So, after wasting way too many months trying to find myself a new physically less demanding job in the broadcasting world, I opened a newspaper one day and decided that I would make a career change for whatever field in which there was the most job offers. Turned out it was IT. This was in the early 80's.

So I took an IT course at the Control Data Institute and, one month after graduating, I landed my first job in IT for a financial institution. Things went on like that for 20+ odd years working for large mainframe installations in banking, insurance and public services, as an employee for several employers and eventually as a contractor. My preferred programming language was IBM Mainframe Assembler but, like everybody else, I worked with whatever environment, application and programming language I needed to. Great way to expand one's knowledge.

Loved my career. I'm retired now and I wouldn't go back even if I was very lucratively asked to. Over the years, the working place became a pressure cooker polluted by way too much bureaucracy. When I retired I had become fed up with too much pen pushing and not enough computing. Too bad.
 

Geano

New member
Oct 15, 2020
1
0
For me science, and technology has been a strong passion of mine. I truly love it, and using my knowledge to help others, My specialization is at this point is technologist. For me that means learning, and understanding tech from a scientific prospective.
 

danlock

Well-known member
Sep 30, 2020
160
53
USA
You'll probably find that most people's specialties are not what they once thought they would be, or were happened upon while they were chasing a different specialty.

It's kind of a thing where you end up in a particular situation in life and specialize in something because that's where life led you or where your circumstances placed you. There's often a combination of things that occurred during your growing years (early to mid-childhood) and other things that happened to you or sparked your interest (or disinterest) during your teens and later. Often, people find themselves in different professions than they thought they'd ever be in (particularly when their professions and specialties do not align!). People sometimes leap completely out of their situations and become something different, too.

If the previous paragraph read like a contradiction, that's because it was, in a way. It's hard (some might say impossible) to specify in a few sentences what causes different people to specialize in different things, or work professionally at whatever job(s) they like doing, whether or not those jobs use their specialties.

Throw in a few wrenches and unexpected events (or not... it wouldn't be true to life if it were predictable for everyone!) and a person might end up doing almost anything on a professional basis during life, or even several different things over a lifetime.

An uncle of one of my parents worked the same job every day for all of his working life. When he retired or died (whichever it was... he outlived many of his family), he had been to work every single day and had never taken even one day off, so the company owed him a bunch of money for the time off which he hadn't taken off!

I'm too curious about everything to be satisfied with something which sounds as mundane as that sounds. I like routines; they're comfortable. I think that's common for a lot of (or most) people. That sounds like a routine which was pretty mundane, though. I'm sure he had other things that happened in his life, but I don't know specifics. For me, too much routine is hard, especially if I don't have a chance to continuously learn and grow wherever I am and whatever I'm doing.

(sorry for any grammatical, logical, or other errors; I don't proofread my typing as well as I should when it's as late as it is for me right now)
 
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Robert Hickman

New member
Oct 12, 2020
4
2
I started out trying to work in IT from an initial intrest in programming, and teaching myself various languages while growing up. I then did a IT course in a collage in the UK (i think what would be called a community college in the USA), and ended up helping the teachers create teaching materials for one of their programming courses.

Following that, i worked as a web developer for about a year, and subsiquentely exited IT as i found it too socially isolating, and i could see how being stuck on a computer was damaging my physical health.

I have been self employed for the last 8 years doing a range of different things, firstly around making italian ocarinas (a ceramic musical instrument), and working to raise awareness of it as a serious instrument through writing books (art of ocarina making, serious ocarina player). Im not sure exactly how i ended up in such a nieche specilisation, but it fits well to my skillset somehow.

Ive covered all of the programming needs of this small businiss myself, as well as doing some freelance programming projects for others, so i am still firmly involved in IT, dispite most of my income coming from working with ceramics.
 

iefbr14

Member
Oct 12, 2020
11
1
Anyone else do well in IT without a degree?

Here! The only IT course I ever attended was at the Control Data Institute which was a short 6 months affair, very far from a college degree. Covered the basics of IT with 3 programming assignments, two in Basic and one in Cobol. I learned 99% of my craft on the job, right from the start and never ended learning until I retired. That's what I loved about IT, especially in my early years when bureaucracy wasn't so pervasive as it eventually became in my later years. My happiness came through design, coding, testing, pushing hardware, etc... Filling reports for management was never my cup of tea.
 

AlanD

Well-known member
Sep 18, 2020
224
73
Rutland UK
Anyone else do well in IT without a degree?

I did. I sort of drifted into IT from the User side. The only training courses that I did were a one week Systems Analysis course, and 2 days out of 3 on an IDMS database course. The rest was all self taught or picked up on the job.
 
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