Why are NextDNS servers not defined in the GRC DNS Benchmark Resolver List?

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I'm guessing they didn't exist at the time he wrote the code, and he's not gone back to look at it again in many years. When @Steve is not busy with SpinRite 6.1 maybe he'll take a breather and come here to answer your question on his own.
 
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". . . Hello, http://www.grc.com/dns/resolvers.csv When I checked the list here, I couldn't see the NextDNS servers. When I add these servers manually and run tests, I see that it gives very good benchmark test results. Do you have a comment on this? . . ."

The default list of DNS servers used by DNSBench is continually updated by success as automatically reported by users running DNSBench.

So if enough people run DNSBench with successfully high-ranking NextDNS test results, then the future default may include NextDNS.

What NextDNS addresses did you use? <- Important information!

Thanks.
 
The DNS benchmark is old and, in my opinion, the world has changed since it was written. To me, the most important aspect of a DNS provider is not speed, but rather ad blocking and/or tracker blocking. As a NextDNS customer, I should add that their optional logging can be very useful too. The focus on speed is a mistake. Granted, Defensive Computing is my thing.

A short list of DNS providers and the blocking features they offer

For an understanding of just how complicated DNS has become in the last few years, see the long DNS explanation here
 
". . . The DNS benchmark is old and, in my opinion, the world has changed since it was written. To me, the most important aspect of a DNS provider is not speed, but rather ad blocking and/or tracker blocking . . ."

What a great idea for DNSBench II . . . what kinds of blocking a DNS service provides, and perhaps an inexhaustible list of test domains to pump through such a test, like all XXX sites, all sites that log activity, all sites that inject off-site code - how many of them are there, is there a daily list findable somewhere, or are such lists proprietary, mined daily, changing daily, and closely-held within each competitive DNS-filtering marketing organization, not available to DNSBench?

Perhaps using crowd-sourced lists of bad actors, like the many subscription lists from PeerBlock - https://www.google.com/search?q=peerblock - and other BlockLists - https://github.com/hagezi/dns-blocklists - DNSBench could first download them all, load them all up into a database, then send queries to each blocked item, and then report if the DNS server delivered a round trip or not.

What are we thinking, a few hundred thousand items to download and test? A million? More?



Then there's IPv6, right?



The subject line of this thread:

Why are NextDNS servers not defined in the GRC DNS Benchmark Resolver List?​

Still unanswered:

What NextDNS addresses did you use? <- Important information!​


Anyway, in the meantime, some folks are still on DSL or slower, oh my, so not only speed, but reliability, as well as security, are important, and DNSBench v1 delivers useful reports on all of those rather quickly and automatically, as well as leading to the Spoofability test - https://www.grc.com/dns/dns.htm - cool or what?

1699928294128.png


Thanks.
 
Why are NextDNS servers not defined in the GRC DNS Benchmark Resolver List?
DNS Benchmark is an OLD and mature product that is no longer updated.

Thus, when NEW DNS servers come along, they are not in the DNS database.

However:

DNS Benchmark (a) allows the users to add any new/additional servers they wish and then (b) allows users to save those additions for use on subsequent DNS Bench runs. Likewise, DNS Benchmark also allows users to delete no longer existing DNS servers and save those deletion changes too.

The DNS landscape is a dynamic ever changing thing, with old DNS servers going away and new DNS servers coming online. Any GRC update to the DNS database would therefore only be temporarily "current", and perhaps arbitrary in some respects. This would also be a recurring task.

DNS Benchmark makes the user responsible for this.
 
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