What to expect when you can't expect Windows 11 on your PC

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MS has helpfully decided to force install the Windows Health app such that you will get more Windows 11 nagging and advertising if you ever use it. ;)
Bleeping Computer has a registry entry to stop it.
 
I'm starting to see the attached image on client systems. The "Stay on Windows 10 for now" is disquieting as clicking that option puts the upgrade into Microsoft's hands for them to decide how long is "now".

I appreciate knowing of the TPM option though it is a difficult item to toggle via remote. My remote access only works when Windows is running and stepping a client through the BIOS of their system over the phone can be tedious (zoom/facetime/skype via cell phone to see the screen is a rare option).

This post is simply a record of what's being encountered in the wild...
 

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disquieting as clicking that option puts the upgrade into Microsoft's hands for them to decide how long is "now".
Well, it's a free upgrade to the product. They assume you want the free upgrade rather than to eventually enter into an "End of Support" situation. You can bypass this using the policy for it if you want, and then all of the Windows 11 stuff just magically goes away. The downside is you won't get any further updates to Window 10 either, unless you remember to keep updating the targeted version when they release.
 
You can bypass this using the policy for it if you want, and then all of the Windows 11 stuff just magically goes away.
Right. I use Group Policy on my Win 10 Pro systems to target Windows 10 and my desired Feature version. I have never seen any Win 11 nag or notification.

The downside is you won't get any further updates to Window 10 either, unless you remember to keep updating the targeted version when they release.
What? I get prompted every month, per my update cadence, for the next cumulative monthly update. I never have to manually go looking for it. I just use one click to install it at my convenience.
 
I get prompted every month, per my update cadence, for the next cumulative monthly update.
Yes, that's correct. What you will NOT get is the next version update. So when Windows 11 22H1 is released you will need to update your policy, or you will never download it.
 
Yes, that's correct. What you will NOT get is the next version update. So when Windows 11 22H1 is released you will need to update your policy, or you will never download it.
Ah, yes! But that is the whole point of targeting. You get to update to the next feature update (by re-targeting) when you want to. And not when MS thinks you should.

Obviously, someone who does not understand targeting could end up being "held" on the currently targeted feature version and left wondering why they are not getting a newer feature version. WU would eventually nag them about EOL and the need to update to a new version.

For those of us that do understand targeting, it is not a problem. Targeting simply gives us some control over our WU destiny.
 
For those with Windows Home, there is a registry entry to target Window 10 21H1 as the last update you get using the registry.

Like the policy method in the previous page, it has the same problem, when Microsoft releases Window 10 22H1 or beyond, you'll need to tweak this setting to get the new update without going to Windows 11.
 
You can bypass this using the policy for it if you want, and then all of the Windows 11 stuff just magically goes away. The downside is you won't get any further updates to Window 10 either, unless you remember to keep updating the targeted version when they release.
Thanks for the call-out - I missed (or forgot about) that post prior in the thread.
 
My laptop has reverted from a message saying it is capable of running Windows 11 to a message saying I can check to see if it can run 11. I haven't done anything so I don't know why the change.
 
As per the post #4: Four years is a long time in consumer operating system development, especially in consumer use. A lot can happen, Windows has its strong points in business use and gaming. I made a decision after the forced imposition of windows 10 on users to move away from Microsoft products for personal use. I still use Winw8.1 on a Dell and will continue to do so until support ends. I now have an IPad, Samsung A52 and home made Linux box for productive work in combination with the Dell. Some essential software is windows based but this can change. - In my very modest opinion Microsoft are gradually loosing some elements of their customer base; huge though it is for now. Win 10 users can bide their time.
 
My laptop has reverted from a message saying it is capable of running Windows 11 to a message saying I can check to see if it can run 11. I haven't done anything so I don't know why the change.
It's Microsoft's doing. Nothing to worry about.

Windows 11 has some rough edges yet. Be content with Windows 10. I am.
 
I'm content with Windows 7.

May your bits be stable and your interfaces be fast. :cool: Ron
 
"I'm content with Windows 7" I should have mentioned that I have a Dell lap top (upgraded with an inexpensive SSD) with 4Gb of ram running Win 7 Pro as a standby Win PC. Its behind a recently updated router combined with a paid for Anti Virus ( I know people may dis agree with this). Used only for browsing, not banking; together with the latest firefox and Chrome browsers. It is a candidate for Linux but the built in Wi Fi (a Broadcom on the M/B) is a pain - It works well enough. The SSD being a WD 256GB model - careful with the install when switching from old HDD to SSD onold kit. Microsoft still regularly run their anti malware utility download on the PC. - I'm mindful of the risks, especially E Mail.