What are some good Networking books you've read?

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vvbudh

Member
Oct 1, 2020
21
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I've read this one,
,

And I also enjoyed this one

Where did you guys get your networking knowledge?
 
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TCP/IP Illustrated, Vol. 1: The Protocols (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series)
(Actually three books in the whole series, but start at one.)

That book is recommended by Ed Skoudis. I've never read it.

A fantastic free book that I have read is Security Engineering by Ross Anderson. It covers several networking topics. https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/book.html It's possible to buy the 1000+ page hardcover if you want.
 
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It still sits on my shelf at work right next to my C the Complete Reference.
 
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Computer Networks, by Andrew S. Tanenbaum. Exhaustive at every level from basic EE modulation to Layer 7 applications.

Networking: A Top-Down Approach" by Kurose & Ross.This book starts with Layer 7, opening a web site, and works down to the low-level protocols. So you start with what everyone understands as an ordinary user, then delve ever deeper until you understand it all. It relies on Wireshark, and has downloadable packet captures if you don't have a network to learn on.

I can't emphasis enough that you can't know networks without a lot of Wireshark time. The best of the books will tell you about the theoretical way things work, and will isolate the protocols from each other. Wireshark shows you all the noisy stuff that goes on, even for a simple HTTP request.
 
When I was working, my goto book was:

Internetworking with TCP/IP: Principles, protocols, and architecture by Doug Comer.

It is 6th edition now. I have the 3rd edition. It is not a cheap book however as Comer teaches at Purdue and it priced as a textbook and he is in the Internet Hall of Fame. I used it as a reference often when looking at Wireshark traces.



Comer’s three-volume textbook series, Internetworking with TCP/IP, written in 1987, is widely considered to be the authoritative reference for Internet protocols. The series played a key role in popularizing Internet protocols by making them more understandable to a new generation of engineers and IT professionals.
 
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Growing Your Business By Exponentially Increasing the Size of Your Social Network, Vol 1: Crashing Parties was not very helpful. 🥳 😒