Vitamin C?

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Sep 17, 2020
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London UK
Sorry folks, we seem to have hijacked this thread. I am no means an expert on UK health insurance or the NHS, but am willing to answer anything I can to the best of my ability, but I think we would need to start a new thread. Maybe NHS?
 
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airchie

Member
Nov 9, 2020
7
7
I moderate a language page for a popular radio show / podcast on language so I try to be careful of my usage.

As far as NEXT goes, I don't think it will be back until 11/10 (I would have said 11/3 but that's election day in the US).
One thing that's definitely worth watching out for is date format.
UK would generally be DD/MM and not MM/DD so easy to cause confusion.
In a multinational forum like this, I'd err on the side of clarity and use "3 Nov" etc (or "Nov 3").

I'm not sure what the rest of europe/world use?
 

PHolder

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2020
635
2
312
Ontario, Canada
UK would generally be DD/MM
That is the most idiotic decision I could imagine. SI uses largest unit first, and that makes the most sense in this case also. Personally, I prefer to do 20-Nov-09 to avoid any confusion, but this is still SI order. The downside of names for the months is they don't internationalize to non-English languages very well, whereas numbers are the same in any language. Probably best to use the full date if unsure, 2020-11-09 is unambiguous as I don't think there are any competing format with the year first... it has to be SI.
 

rfrazier

Well-known member
Sep 30, 2020
231
77
There are many ways of writing dates around the world. FWIW, at least in Windows, if you name a file with a date embedded in the name in YYYYMMDD format, and if you're sorting by name, then the items with dates will be sub sorted in chronological order. For example:

lecture-notes-20200510.doc
lecture-notes-20200520.doc

In the US, the most common numeric format is

MM/DD/YY or
MM/DD/YYYY

I sometimes like to use periods instead of slashes but I don't know if anyone else does.

Since there are so many ways of writing dates, it really gets confusing if one or more of the numbers are <= 12 or even <= to the current year. Best to double check anything with date information that doesn't originate in your own region with your own customs. I haven't actually read the following article but the link looks relevant. I'm sure there are thousands of other such articles.


Ron
 
Sep 17, 2020
94
31
63
London UK
There are many ways of writing dates around the world. FWIW, at least in Windows, if you name a file with a date embedded in the name in YYYYMMDD format, and if you're sorting by name, then the items with dates will be sub sorted in chronological order. For example:

lecture-notes-20200510.doc
lecture-notes-20200520.doc

In the US, the most common numeric format is

MM/DD/YY or
MM/DD/YYYY

I sometimes like to use periods instead of slashes but I don't know if anyone else does.

Since there are so many ways of writing dates, it really gets confusing if one or more of the numbers are <= 12 or even <= to the current year. Best to double check anything with date information that doesn't originate in your own region with your own customs. I haven't actually read the following article but the link looks relevant. I'm sure there are thousands of other such articles.


Ron
I guess it is what you grow up with or are taught. To me it make sense to say 11th September 2001, rather than September 11th 2001. The phrase 9/11 is known by everyone, but I wonder if it happened at Canary Wharf London, we would be calling it 11/9?
 
Sep 17, 2020
94
31
63
London UK
I'm a scientist, with a degree and everything
Well done with the degree.
I think dates (and language) are a regional thing, and each country does not has to follow any one format.
I did post a thread about the difference between US & UK language (I know I am suppose to provide a link, but not sure how to do so, could someone help please?)
 

rfrazier

Well-known member
Sep 30, 2020
231
77
The following would work in Firefox. Find a link to your post by clicking what's new in the upper tool bar. Then, further down and to the left, click what's new again. Search for your post as you go back in history. Otherwise, click on your name at the top and click your content and scroll through that to find a link to your post. You may be able to find your post with the search system, but I've had poor results that way. Once you've found it, you can right click and click in the sub menu copy link location. Then, when you're writing a post, right click and click in the sub menu paste to paste the link.

Ron
 

Steve

(as in GRC)
Staff member
Feb 1, 2019
351
1
898
66
Southern CA, USA
www.grc.com
@MLJ : I'm very much interested in sharing some of the other things I've learned during my decade of focused research (from before I turned 50 through my turning 60) into the support of human health and vitality endurance with dietary supplementation.

Two of my best friends from high school, Jim and Charlie, (members of our small gang who used to hang out in the “Math Resource Center”) became MD's. One is a general practitioner working in a clinical setting, and the other has been an E.R. Doc throughout his career. We're all still close friends and in touch after 50 years. If anything goes wrong with my body (fortunately still a rare occurrence at age 65) I'll reach out to ask for their opinion based upon their training and their many years of experience in the field. And, because they both know that I have researched and educated myself far more than their training and experience has provided, they are both continually asking for my advice about supplementation. (They have both resolved their problems with insomnia by using my healthy sleep formula with great success.)

Lay people typically assume that doctors, by virtue of their training, certification and experience, are thereby imbued with mystical medical knowledge and abilities that allows that person to transfer their responsibility for their own health to their physician. But there is nothing mystical about medical knowledge. It is just knowledge. And it can be gained by anyone who has the drive, determination and desire. I have had all three.

Unlike my knowledge of technology, electronics, computing and networking, which is extensive by virtue of the way I have spent my entire life, my supplementation-related medical knowledge is quite spotty. There is FAR more that I do not know than I do. But those few things that I do know, I know extensively and deeply. And on those few topics I am quite useful. Not because I have any formal training, but simply because I have done the research and subsequent experimentation.

Just as there is a wonderful and compelling story behind our need for significant levels of supplemental vitamin D, there are similar compelling explanations for our need for supplemental vitamin C, magnesium, CoQ10, and a few others. As soon as I can catch up with my prior commitments (I'm being careful not to add to that pile now) I fully intend to get those things documented, and their stories told. All of my close friends and family — not only doctors — have benefited and are benefiting from what I have learned and thereby recommend about many other dietary supplements. As I have with vitamin D, I would love to share what I have learned far more widely so that many more people might benefit.
 

MLJ2

Member
Jan 5, 2021
5
0
@MLJ : I'm very much interested in sharing some of the other things I've learned during my decade of focused research (from before I turned 50 through my turning 60) into the support of human health and vitality endurance with dietary supplementation.

Two of my best friends from high school, Jim and Charlie, (members of our small gang who used to hang out in the “Math Resource Center”) became MD's. One is a general practitioner working in a clinical setting, and the other has been an E.R. Doc throughout his career. We're all still close friends and in touch after 50 years. If anything goes wrong with my body (fortunately still a rare occurrence at age 65) I'll reach out to ask for their opinion based upon their training and their many years of experience in the field. And, because they both know that I have researched and educated myself far more than their training and experience has provided, they are both continually asking for my advice about supplementation. (They have both resolved their problems with insomnia by using my healthy sleep formula with great success.)

Lay people typically assume that doctors, by virtue of their training, certification and experience, are thereby imbued with mystical medical knowledge and abilities that allows that person to transfer their responsibility for their own health to their physician. But there is nothing mystical about medical knowledge. It is just knowledge. And it can be gained by anyone who has the drive, determination and desire. I have had all three.

Unlike my knowledge of technology, electronics, computing and networking, which is extensive by virtue of the way I have spent my entire life, my supplementation-related medical knowledge is quite spotty. There is FAR more that I do not know than I do. But those few things that I do know, I know extensively and deeply. And on those few topics I am quite useful. Not because I have any formal training, but simply because I have done the research and subsequent experimentation.

Just as there is a wonderful and compelling story behind our need for significant levels of supplemental vitamin D, there are similar compelling explanations for our need for supplemental vitamin C, magnesium, CoQ10, and a few others. As soon as I can catch up with my prior commitments (I'm being careful not to add to that pile now) I fully intend to get those things documented, and their stories told. All of my close friends and family — not only doctors — have benefited and are benefiting from what I have learned and thereby recommend about many other dietary supplements. As I have with vitamin D, I would love to share what I have learned far more widely so that many more people might benefit.
Thanks Steve. I look forward to it.

On an unrelated note, when I came back to the forums this time it made we setup a new account. Not sure what happened in the intervening time. I used the same login as before and tried it both from my browser extension and using the iPhone app with the same result.

Didn't see where else to put that information, so at least sharing it here.
 

PHolder

Well-known member
Sep 16, 2020
635
2
312
Ontario, Canada
On an unrelated note, when I came back to the forums this time it made we setup a new account. Not sure what happened in the intervening time. I used the same login as before and tried it both from my browser extension and using the iPhone app with the same result.
I presume you're referring to SQRL login. SQRL generates its credentials from the secret stored locally. Assuming nothing has happened to the local credentials, then it would be something on the site. As I use SQRL here, and I have not seen any issue, I am not convinced the issue is the site. So could anything have happened to your local SQRL credentials? Perhaps the better idea is to head over to the SQRL forums (linked in the toolbar above) and discuss it there.