Solution?

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  • BootAble – FreeDOS boot testing freeware

    To obtain direct, low-level access to a system's mass storage drives, SpinRite runs under a GRC-customized version of FreeDOS which has been modified to add compatibility with all file systems. In order to run SpinRite it must first be possible to boot FreeDOS.

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DTChristey

Member
Oct 8, 2020
6
4
Edwards Air Force Base
Ok. Here's a small rant and a question: I am an Air Force Security Specialist. I'm always looking for a more secure way for sensitive communications / business. What bothers me is how we currently do business. Examples: Today, in 2021, the cost accounting system I'm required to use for my time cards and bill programs requires me to use Internet Explorer, TLS 1.0, and Active X; my computer is configured with Windows 10, with Defender and McAfee running; the DoD has implemented new portals written in Flash until last year. I could go on...

I believe, if you want a secure system, limit your attack surfaces and control as much of your environment you can. So...

Here's my question: How hard would it be to create a server and client for secure communications. Connections would be through a client other than an internet browser. Connections would use SQRL or PKI for authentication. After authentication, encrypted connections would only support ASCII text. No graphics, no JAVA, no videos, no Active X, etc. Like the Wise and Vax terminals we used back in the day. Wouldn't this greatly reduce the attack surface? Less exploitable code? Less interpreters? How hard would this be to implement on a Linux system? I imagine you could create a custom Linux kernel with strictly limited functionality to limit attack surface.

I would be the first to sign up for a banking service that only used ASCII text to conduct business. I don't need to see ads when I want to transfer funds between accounts. I don't need trackers, like buttons, or other code running and tracking me when I want to see my account balance. Does this make sense? Am I being stupid?

Thanks if your read this.

dc
 
You could do most of what you want now using an ssh client like Putty, connecting to an ssh server, which is in every Linux kernel. The problem comes when you need fancy menues etc to navigate, which in turn require some logic to process the choices. I used to support an online banking system very like that back in the late '80's. Very functional and worked happily over a 1200/1200 dial-up line.
 
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You could do most of what you want now using an ssh client like Putty, connecting to an ssh server, which is in every Linux kernel. The problem comes when you need fancy menues etc to navigate, which in turn require some logic to process the choices. I used to support an online banking system very like that back in the late '80's. Very functional and worked happily over a 1200/1200 dial-up line.
Thank you. I'm starting to realize that I need to become a programmer. Hmmm. 53 and I need to learn a new trick... ;-)
 
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