SN979 Discussion

  • SpinRite v6.1 Release #3
    Guest:
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    /Steve.
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SeanBZA

Well-known member
Oct 1, 2020
167
57
Busy with SN 979, and thinking that recall will very likely implement ignoring a window by simply recording it, then having a field in the database saying to not show this field because of the open window, but still keeping the data in the screen. Because that is easier, and also some PHB was saying the user could change their mind, and want this later on......
 
As well, that wireless vulnerability is very easy to leverage into a more global attack, after all, you only need a machine under your control within wireless range, so any compromised machine (you know, that old machine running Win7 that has never been patched, is on the Internet, and is there for say a hotel reception general use, or something like your neighbours old XP machine running still, because all they do is use it for AOL email) that is around can easily be used as springboard, getting into the more valuable networks, because now the first creaky old vunerable machine is able to attack the nearest one, and install a simple relay on it, with full admin permissions, and this in turn can be used to pivot through entire networks, probably automatically, each time adding to the botnet till there are none left to infect, as each infection looks for itself running first. Then you can search for the juicy data, exfiltrate it, then do the usual encrypt and ask for bitcoin to decrypt as final measure, while busy seeing what valuable info is there to sell and make a quick first profit.
 
On the pirate thing, best for Google is to simply comply, and also remove any reference to Canal Plus as well, as they can simply say that they wanted to prevent the illegal distribution of content, so stopped it at source. Or simply change all of the French DNS to resolve to the contact details for Canal plus instead.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Badrod
... and also remove any reference to Canal Plus as well, as they can simply say that they wanted to prevent the illegal distribution of content, so stopped it at source.
As Homer might have said, "Le Canal Plus!? What the hell is that!?"
(Simpsons S10 E19)
 
DNS CNAME problem explained very well. Good that you pointed out somebody in another department in a large corporation might not have renewed the domain, yet neglected to inform person responsible for DNS to remove the CNAME record.
I work in a large corporation and we have more than 100 domains to monitor and several that have already gone out of flavour. Just wondering if there is an easy way to throw a bunch of domain names into a script to let it check whether the CNAMES are configured properly (or not) and allow one to get them sorted before they get taken over by an attacker? (Or even just a way to check one)
 
(snip) ... check whether the CNAMES are configured properly (or not) and allow one to get them sorted before they get taken over by an attacker? (Or even just a way to check one)
I have a handful of domains and I'm wondering the same thing.

So far I've taken the slow route - so to speak - and looked at the CNAME entries one by one on my own DNS records, via cPanel for example.

I've tried a few iOS "DNS tool" Apps ... but it seems that the DNS CNAME entry itself is not amenable to being 'examined'. Rather that CNAME entry is meant to be 'heeded', or (as Steve has explained) is meant to be taken as a 'redirection' to another domain name ...

... so - to look at it from 'outside' - is a bit like chasing one's tail!