Inconsistent RS results for various small mSATA drives

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peterhatoz

Member
Sep 30, 2020
5
0
Hi,
I've been installing some small older mSATA drives (which use SATA II I believe) into laptops that I rebuild to sell or give away to people who need them. The drives are mostly 32GB (one is 128GB) and I install Windows 10 on these drives to increase boot speed and to create extra space on the rotating HDD.
Once RS became available, I thought it would be useful to benchmark the mSATA drives and preferentially install the fastest ones.

I obtained some surprising (to me) and inconsistent results when I ran RS several times on the same drive, which I will attempt to document here. I kept re-running RS on each drive until the results were consistent.

These 32GB tests were done using RS-PR8, but, unfortunately, I reformatted the USB stick and lost the original log files when I installed the official RS. So, these rounded results are taken from my hand-written notes of the experience. Each line is a new RS run on the same drive.

Let's start with 32GB mSATA drive #2 for a "new" laptop build ...
Code:
 0%      25%   50%     75%    100
115     145     211     211     209
124     146     211     211     209
124     145     211     211     209
125     146     211     211     209
125     146     211     211     209
Now, drive #3 ...
Code:
 0      25%     50%     75%     100
108     134     210     211     207
109     135     210     211     208
110     136     210     211     208
110     136     210     211     208
Drive #1 ...
Code:
 0      25%     50%     75%     100
121     143     211     211     208
121     142     211     211     208
121     142     211     211     208
Drive #4 ...
Code:
 0      25%     50%     75%     100
101     133     210     208     208
107     133     210     208     208
107     133     210     208     208

The overall speed results were a little disappointing, but I guess still a lot faster than HDD speeds.
@Steve, do the above gradual improvements show some sort of drive self-healing?

Now for the mysterious results on the larger (and faster) 128GB drive which I use on my regular everyday laptop . I *do* have the logs for these tests, but it's easier to see the changes if I just tabulate the runs in order, one per line (and I'm just looking at only the first two columns) ...
Code:
 0%     25%
419     540
368     490
327     499
432     544
312     497
386     538
372     500

What is going on here?? On a few of the runs, I had requested more details, so I went from my hand-written notes to the logs and found things like this ...
Code:
522.5   590.7   604.5   604.3   604.4
450.1   604.1   605.2   606.4   604.9
472.7   604.1   604.7   600.5   604.5
  5.0   604.1   604.5   604.8   604.5
        602.6   605.0   604.3   604.9
 77.8   604.3   604.6   603.3   604.9
 78.2   606.6   604.7   603.6   604.6
 79.6   600.7   604.5   604.2   604.4
 78.5   604.7   607.4   604.3   605.1
 79.5   603.3   601.8   603.2   604.7
484.1   604.3   602.7   604.7   604.8
603.5   604.6   603.8   603.4   604.6
437.9   604.4   602.9   604.4   604.7
405.7   603.2   603.6   604.3   604.9

So, it seemed to me that maybe there were "bad spots" on the drive which were throwing out the average values because of the way RS handles that condition.

BTW, @Steve, how *does* RS handle that condition?

Because this is a GPT drive, I cannot run SR on it ... so I though maybe CHKDSK would do a reasonable job of fixing it? Wrong!!

The RS results after running "chkdsk /b" on the drive in Windows 10 were worse ...
Code:
  0%      25%
256     469
328     488
318     373
229     368
301     547
428     536
... but it does look like some self-healing occurred by the end of the last run. This is some of the detail from the start of the final run ...
Code:
Driv Size  Drive Identity     Location:    0      25%     50%     75%     100
---- ----- ---------------------------- ------- ------- ------- ------- -------
 81  120GB SSD128G                       428.7   536.6   532.6   538.9   512.4 
---- ----- ---------------------------- ------- ------- ------- ------- -------
                                          92.3   571.7   654.3   579.7   654.9 
                                          90.9   555.1   665.2   606.1   664.6 
                                          89.5   574.3   664.7   626.5   664.7 
                                          89.7   594.5   664.5   619.3   664.7 
                                         531.6   564.5   664.8   583.4   664.9 
                                         664.1   664.2   664.4   664.2   664.4 
                                         664.7   664.3   664.8   662.8   665.0 
                                         663.1   664.1   664.9   664.8   664.5 
                                         481.6   663.1   664.2   663.5   664.9

@Steve, to my eye, it looks like most of the 511 results in the final column, apart from the one bad spot I'm about to list, are around 660MB/s ... I don't understand why the average is presented as 512.4 (when I do the rough maths myself I get about 651MB/s for the average)? Here's the one bad spot from the 100% column ...
Code:
                                         457.7   662.9   665.1   664.5   664.1 
                                         505.9   663.4   660.2   664.4     5.5 
                                         628.9   664.6   664.3   664.3         
                                         572.7   663.7   661.8   664.3    88.7 
                                         540.2   663.8   664.7   665.0    87.1 
                                         552.1   664.2   663.0   663.9    89.9 
                                         549.2   662.7   664.3   665.2    89.7 
                                         658.5   664.8   664.0   664.5    89.7 
                                         579.3   662.7   664.0   664.6   545.3 
                                         496.6   667.4   663.3   664.0   664.2 
                                         556.5   661.1   664.8   665.0   663.7

I will attach the log file of this final run, but have kept the others in case any interest in this topic is generated.
Cheers, Peter.
 

Attachments

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