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Hard drive storage

#1

D

Dagannoth

EDIT: I found a solution.


How do you store your hard drives? I currently have mine stacked up in a few boxes, but I want something better. The products at https://harddriveshelf.com/ look great, but they're quite expensive. I bought a plastic cabinet on Amazon, but the listed dimensions are wrong. The drawers are about 5.5 inches on the inside, which is just a tiny bit too short for hard drives. Here's my current estimated inventory:
  • 50+ 3.5"
  • 30+ 2.5" (mostly SSDs, but also a few laptop HDDs)
  • 20 2.5" SAS (about the thickness of 2 SSDs)
  • 6 NVMe SSDs, but that number is growing


#2

Dave

Dave

How do you store your hard drives? I currently have mine stacked up in a few boxes, but I want something better. The products at https://harddriveshelf.com/ look great, but they're quite expensive. I bought a plastic cabinet on Amazon, but the listed dimensions are wrong. The drawers are about 5.5 inches on the inside, which is just a tiny bit too short for hard drives. Here's my current estimated inventory:
  • 50+ 3.5"
  • 30+ 2.5" (mostly SSDs, but also a few laptop HDDs)
  • 20 2.5" SAS (about the thickness of 2 SSDs)
  • 6 NVMe SSDs, but that number is growing
My, far fewer, ones are in a drawer. @Steve's, probably:

1613605270315.png


#3

xox101

xox101

Wouldn't it be easier to simply buy or build a server and use it as both storage for the drives and storage for your data? Or am I missing something?


#4

D

Dagannoth

A lot of these are old/broken drives that I have removed from computers I have fixed or upgraded. I don't want to store anything on these drives. They are just for testing.


#5

S

SeanBZA

Got a couple of cardboard wine boxes full of drives, the ones that failed a quick SMART test and a full scan were placed in the one pile, and had the boards stripped off, the drive itself opened and I took them for scrap metal. I do now have a big collection of neodymium magnets on the fridge door, and am using them in all sorts of applications as very strong magnets. Platters were all removed and erased, easiest way was to simply bend them in half, though the glass ones were a bit of an issue, so I did all the first tries of a stack in a thick plastic bag, to contain the glass. As the bent platters are useless, and near impossible to read from easily, they also went to scrap. Only around 6 boxes to go now, as I got a whole load of drives from an ISP to dispose of, and easiest way was to simply overwrite them completely, assuming they actually passed the SMART test. Just used a spare computer with a few USB converters, so that I could do multiple drives at a time, booted off a live distro in a USB drive. Fill all internal connectors (4 SATA and 2 IDE) and connected 3 external USB drives. Slow but very low maintenance.


#6

Dave

Dave

I do now have a big collection of neodymium magnets
And how many pinched fingers / blood blisters?


#7

S

SeanBZA

And how many pinched fingers / blood blisters?
Not from those, though I did shatter a few, the more modern ones are really thin these days.


#8

D

Dagannoth

I found a solution: plastic trays from Tek Source Solutions. They're not perfect, but they're good enough for now. Each set of trays is $59.95, which is $1/slot for 3.5" and $0.60/slot for 2.5". The cost per slot goes down with the higher quantity options, but I didn't need that many.
They also have cardboard box versions that come with foam for the top and bottom. $74.95 each.
Here's my first full tray:
C35 Top.jpg

I used some masking tape and a sharpie to label the side. I'm calling these trays 'C35' for 'Case that holds 3.5" drives'. The left column is A, and the right is B. A full slot identifier in my inventory spreadsheet looks like 'C35-1-B5'.
C35 Side.jpg


#9

R

Ralph

What I have been using for good disks I want to keep is a .50 calibre ammo can. Some anti static bubble wrap in the bottom for a bit of shock isolation and I stand the disks on end. A packet of active silica gel inside keeps humidity under control for any temperature swings and an indicator card for spot checks. The cans can be stacked and have a good handle. Air tight, water resistant if not waterproof, and static protection. Except for dropping or fire anything inside is pretty safe.