Future UEFI support in SpinRite

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Mandelstamm

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Sep 21, 2021
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I hope there is a solution soon. More and more machines won't support legacy anymore. I'm working on a 2018 vintage HP with problem.
 

Steve

(as in GRC)
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Feb 1, 2019
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I hope there is a solution soon. More and more machines won't support legacy anymore. I'm working on a 2018 vintage HP with problem.
I altered SpinRite's planned development sequence for the purpose of getting it over onto UEFI sooner rather than later.

The move to UEFI is not a small thing for SpinRite because it means dropping all use of DOS, which will not run on UEFI. That means porting SpinRite to another OS that WILL run on UEFI. Fortunately, SpinRite has never used most of DOS, so that won't be a big deal. But it's still not nothing.

The original plan was to bring up native USB and NVMe support before making the move to UEFI. That's what's changed. Since I already have ATA/IDE and AHCI driver code running for SpinRite, that's what I'll be bringing up with SpinRite v6.1 on DOS only. THEN the work to move SpinRite to UEFI, to a new OS, and then add native USB and NVMe will follow. :)
 

Barry Wallis

Magician in Training
I altered SpinRite's planned development sequence for the purpose of getting it over onto UEFI sooner rather than later.

The move to UEFI is not a small thing for SpinRite because it means dropping all use of DOS, which will not run on UEFI. That means porting SpinRite to another OS that WILL run on UEFI. Fortunately, SpinRite has never used most of DOS, so that won't be a big deal. But it's still not nothing.

The original plan was to bring up native USB and NVMe support before making the move to UEFI. That's what's changed. Since I already have ATA/IDE and AHCI driver code running for SpinRite, that's what I'll be bringing up with SpinRite v6.1 on DOS only. THEN the work to move SpinRite to UEFI, to a new OS, and then add native USB and NVMe will follow. :)
Thanks for the update.
 

rfrazier

Well-known member
Sep 30, 2020
304
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@Steve This may be easy to say and hard to do. But, don't throw us old farts and old fart computers out just yet. Not everybody is cutting edge. I'm typing this on a Win 7 BIOS based laptop from 2009 or so. In fact, I just spent the last week troubleshooting blue screens because something had gotten corrupted on the 2 TB Samsung SSD. I think it's back up. Still, I want nothing to do with Windows 10, or 11. Don't like the design. Don't like the UI. Don't like the spy station core of it. Don't like the continual patches break it you're reporting. No offense to anyone that does like it. But, backward compatibility is still a good thing.

May your bits be stable and your interfaces be fast. :cool: Ron
 
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DanR

Dan
Sep 17, 2020
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Still, I want nothing to do with Windows 10, or 11. Don't like the design. Don't like the UI. Don't like the spy station core of it. Don't like the continual patches break it you're reporting. No offense to anyone that does like it.

No Offense taken, Ron.

However, I think some perspective should be addressed here.

First, Win 7 has had its share of patch issues breaking stuff, particularly in 2018, but nothing, admittedly, comparable to the scope of Win 10. I think 2019 was probably rather sane by comparison to 2018. (I missed all that because I stopped patching Win 7 after Dec 2017)

Second, MS began imbuing Win 7 with Win 10 style telemetry in late 2018, via the Security Only updates, and continued the practice in 2019. So, if you have a Win 7 machine fully patched as of Jan 2020, congrats! You have Win 10 style telemetry active on that machine. (Again, I missed all that because I stopped patching Win 7 after Dec 2017)

Third, much (most?) of the Win 10 patch issues I read and hear about are Enterprise issues, affecting Enterprise 3rd party apps, Enterprise servers, Enterprise domain controllers, etc. None of that has impacted my home use of Win 10 as none of that applies to my personal home use of Win 10.

Fourth, Win 11 is not yet worth talking about (IMO). But, since you mentioned it . . .

The current preview release of Win 11 is late alpha/early beta. As such, it will almost certainly be different from whatever MS releases this fall. Given its restrictive hardware requirements, I suspect many will pass on it for awhile. I will.

Win 11 currently is Win 10 cosmetically dressed up, with nothing compelling about it - yet. I do not plan to have anything to do with it for 2 or 3 years, to give MS time/opporunity to get its act together and actually make something worthwhile of Win 11 (hopefully). It took MS 3 years or so to accomplish that with Win 10. I would expect something similar with Win 11.

Meanwhile, I will continue to read and listen and learn so as to eventually make a late but informed move to Win 11 X years from now. That approach appears to have worked well for me for Win 10, as I made a late but informed and painless transition to Win 10 in June 2021. Hopefully the same will be true of Win 11 - someday. Until then, hopefully, Win 10 will serve me well though EOL in mid 2025.

Note: Although I have only been using Win 10 day-day since June 2021, I have had a low end Win 10 LT since the fall of 2019 for the purpose of learning about and understanding Win 10. It has been an invaluable learning tool for me. And, it has been updating smoothly and painlessly for almost 2 years now. I do have to give credit to the good folks at AskWoody for valuable Win 10 knowledge I learned from them.

So, do I like Win 10? Well ... somewhat. (How’s that for a ringing endorsement? :) ) It’s not Win 7, as it reminds me every day. I use Open Shell to make it look, feel like Win 7 as much as is possible. I use O&O Shut Up 10 to control much of it’s telemetry. I defer updates to give MS a window of opportunity to fix them when they are broken, before I install them on my machines. I have become comfortable with it. I can live with it. I know it is much more secure than the unsupported Win 7 can now be. I also know it is not Win 7.
 

rfrazier

Well-known member
Sep 30, 2020
304
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MS began imbuing Win 7 with Win 10 style telemetry
@DanR You bring up some interesting points, and more questions. Since you mention telemetry, I remember about a year ago or more that I had to disable, remove, and ban a bunch of Windows patches just for that reason. Pretty sure I got most of it.
So, do I like Win 10? Well ... somewhat.
INTERESTING ... ahem ... endorsement.
Open Shell to make it look, feel like Win 7
Can you share more information and or links about that?
I use O&O Shut Up 10
That sounds cool. Howz it work?
I defer updates to give MS a window of opportunity to fix
You must have Win 10 Pro to do that if I recall correctly.
I know it is much more secure than the unsupported Win 7 can now be.
I'm not so sure, however, I'm going to start a new thread about Windows 10 so as not to hijack this one from its topic too much.

That thread is:

May your bits be stable and your interfaces be fast. :cool: Ron
 

DanR

Dan
Sep 17, 2020
200
52
Can you share more information and or links about that?
Open Shell


That sounds cool. Howz it work?
O&O ShutUp10


This is a stand-alone tool. I.E. it installs nothing. Just run it and under Actions, select Apply only recommended settings. That's it. You can scroll down to see what is now turned off (green - safe) and what is left on (yellow and red - I do not touch these). Exiting the tool leaves the settings intact.

You must have Win 10 Pro to do that if I recall correctly.
Of course! :)

Win 10 Home pretty much gives MS carte blanche freedom with Windows Update, with one small exception. It is possible to use a registry tweak to target a desired version of Win 10, which will prevent WU from advancing to a newer version (feature release).
 

DanR

Dan
Sep 17, 2020
200
52
I have also posted a copy of my previous post in the new thread that Ron linked above.
 

miquelfire

I like red!
Sep 26, 2020
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You must have Win 10 Pro to do that if I recall correctly.
There was a version that suddenly allowed that for Home users as well. I'm sure it can be found in the Security Now transcripts. (Only reason I know about it, as I haven't bother to check my only Win 10 Home machine about that feature)
 

DanR

Dan
Sep 17, 2020
200
52
Some

There was a version that suddenly allowed that for Home users as well. I'm sure it can be found in the Security Now transcripts. (Only reason I know about it, as I haven't bother to check my only Win 10 Home machine about that feature)
What specific feature are you speaking of?
 

DanR

Dan
Sep 17, 2020
200
52
Miguelfire, I am not aware of any update deferrals for Win 10 Home? (Other than a registry tweak to target a desired feature version)

Quite the contrary: MS removed deferral settings from Win 10 with the 2004 feature update. :(

However, thanks to the folks at AskWoody, I learned how to maintain the deferral cadence I used with 1909 and prior. It worked for me with 2004 and currently works with 20H2. :)
 

SeanBZA

Active member
Oct 1, 2020
40
5
USB is going to be the hard nut to crack, a lot of USB drive enclosures strip out SMART info, and limit the commands that can be passed through to the drive. I have met a few that did that, and a good number that do allow it.
 

DanR

Dan
Sep 17, 2020
200
52
USB is going to be the hard nut to crack, a lot of USB drive enclosures strip out SMART info, and limit the commands that can be passed through to the drive.
Given that, and the many USB versions now in existence, I could see the USB driver development being on par with the AHCI development effort of the summer of 2020. Time will tell.
 

Ralph

Active member
Sep 24, 2020
42
3
I've been using Windows 10 and like it, most of the time. My main reason for still using Windows is the software I have that runs under it. Currently my plans are to keep my current Wndows 10 machine as is. When I get my next one, take this one (Win 10) offline and keep it running for applications, but put a different OS on the new one. Every time I hear about Microsoft's fiascos on SN plants the 2 machine approach deeper into my plans.

My previous laptop has 10 running on it. Due to a broken hinge on the display I keep it stationary on a shelf and it's been 'air gapped' for over a year. Aside from that it is fully functional just not put online or updated any more. An older laptop I lent to someone was just returned. It's 32 bit and was originally Windows 7. Currently it has Oracle Linux (32 bit) installed but hasn't been updated in some time. I haven't decided what to do with it, being 32 bit limits it some. I have to check for 32 bit OS options other than Windows. Umbuntu, Tails, or maybe reinstall Oracle Linux- any suggestions for an old 32 bit laptop OS?