experience with standing desk and treadmills for computer programmers

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coffeeprogrammer

Well-known member
Jul 19, 2021
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I will be 40 this year and I’ve have a pretty bad weight problem for the last 12 years or so. In the middle of November 2023 I maxed out at 323 pounds. I have finally got to a place where I can go to the gym regularly. By cutting my diet to down to less than a 1000 calories a day and doing crossfit 3 to 4 times a week I am down to 300 today. I have set a loose two pound per week goal, but I am just barely making it and I am eating almost nothing. I have a garmin watch to monitor my heart rate and it also it always telling me that I need to get moving and that I am not getting enough steps. I work from home so there is not even walking around an office. As I have to be at my computer at 8 hours a day and I live in Maine and it is winter, walking is not much of an option. Today I ordered a standing desk and a walking treadmill to go under it. My plan is to set it up next to my normal desk and then buy three new monitor and mirror the signal to my existing three monitor. So in theory I could now walk 8 hours a day. The treadmill I bought said it had a max speed of 3.8 mph I think. I guess my question is does anybody have an experience with these standing desk walking treadmill combinations? Anybody that has started in the 300 pound range like me? The fact is to loose the 20 pounds I did with crossfit was hard in the sense that I had to eat almost nothing the whole time. I actually like the exercise its self, but the numbers are not happening fast enough. I have not had a chance to ask a doctor what they think, but I do think something is wrong because this is such a slow process.
 
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I have found there are 2 schools of thought regarding weight loss. The first is the one that you are trying, and if you asked your doctor, they would probably recommend, the "Eat Less, Move More" plan. It did not work for me, and sounds like you are not getting the results you want. One theory I have heard is that eating less slows your metabolism, so your body needs less, and you don't loose any significant weight. This was my experience.

The competing theory is that to loose fat, you need to lower your insulin enough to allow fat to be released from where your body has stored it. Any time you eat, your blood sugar rises, and insulin is released to store the blood sugar as fat (and glycogen, but that is a detail for another time). So even if you eat as little as 1000 calories, if you spread that over a day, your insulin will never drop low enough to allow your fat cells to release fat, instead of storing it. The answer is intermittent fasting. Not eating for an extended period (usually 16 to 18 hours), and then having all your food in a small 6 to 8 hour window, will allow the insulin to drop and fat to be released. Your metabolism will not slow down, because your body is being fed, on the fat it previously stored.

2 books with more details are "The Obesity Code" by Dr. Jason Fung and "Fast, Feat, Repeat" by Gin Stephens.

Good Luck
 
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I have had some results with eating less and moving more, but not to the level I want. So far as getting my insulin levels lower, I am wondering if there is some way I can check my insulin level through out the day. If I am sure that my levels have been low then that will make me feel better. Now it is 3:34pm in the afternoon and I got up about 8:30am. I have had nothing but coffee and powerade zero which is sugar free and zero calories today. I am wondering what my insulin levels are currently. Also what the units would be and what the unit should be for what you are taking about. One problem is that I what really have a hard time giving up coffee. Most days I don’t mind going a long time without food, at least I have gotten into a place where I am ok with it, but giving up coffee would be very hard for me. I just bought the Fast Feast Repeat audio book on audible and starting listening, so maybe that will help. I also have been listening to some of the Andrew Huberman podcasts, which I did listen to one on fasting and I think it was recommended. Thanks.
 
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Unfortunately, I know of no method to check your insulin level yourself in real time. Measuring your blood glucose level measures insulin indirectly, because insulin rises in response to higher blood glucose. My experience agrees with Gin Stephens, it is better to measure if you are getting the results you want (lower weight, clothes fitting better, etc.)
If you are reading (listening to) Fast, Feast, Repeat, by the time you get to Chapter 4 on Clean Fasting, you will find that black coffee or tea (black or green), and water or acceptable while fasting. Sweetened beverages (even 0 calorie) are not, because they have been proven to generate an insulin response, which can make you hungry. Your fasting will be easier if you stick to beverages that are not sweet.
I gave up on Huberman, because he takes 3 hours to say something that could be covered in a 15 minute article. I prefer the "Fasting Method" podcast, put out by colleagues of Jason Fung.
 
Those 1000 calories have to be good calories. You need enough protein, minerals, and vitamins.
There are devices that stick in your arm and monitor your insulin levels continuously & send the info to an app.
 
I think you may be thinking of Continuous Glucose Monitors, which do not directly measure insulin.
A lot of people why use intermittent fasting find that they need to supplement electrolytes to avoid cramps. I find that a daily magnesium supplement does the trick.
 
I was in a similar boat and lost 100lbs over about a 1 year period. I feel like I pushed it a little too hard, but that's the way I've always done things. Straight ahead, rigid, pound it in the head til it's done. Once the decision is made, you're already there. I walked for one hour early every morning before work, 5-6 days per week, followed by 20 minutes of mild weight lifting. I had a couple of protein shakes every day, plenty, and I mean PLENTY of raw veggies, and cut out carbs. Lots of protein. No restaurants. No cheating. And the most impactful bit of knowledge... I got used to feeling hungry. I decided that hunger was not synonymous with pain.

Before that I had tried riding my bicycle like a maniac, but the problem with that was that I got VERY hungry after riding, and I found it to be too hard to resist. So I switched to the daily brisk walk.
 
One of the concern has been, how does this work in terms of medical science. I of course have things that of unique to me, but I just want to know in terms of any human body being an orgasm, what can be done. First question: What do you have to do to force the weight off and second question: how do you do it in a healthy way and that it is permanent. When I was starting this, I had the realization that in my body and mind, I don’t really know what hunger is. What I would think is hunger, was really just not being stuffed. I have had a few times when I my mind tells me as an automatic thought and not a concerned, deductive one, that I am hungry. I have to stop, concentrate on it, listening to all my bodies feedback. Is that really the signal I am getting? I don’t have enough fuel.

Mostly at this point I am not eating because I am hungry, I am eating only because it has been 24 hours since the last time I ate anything. So the current tend is, with some exceptions, that I am only eating once a day. But I don’t think it is that I am really all that hungry, it’s just that I have been working, on a computer, and I need a mental break from that. I think the food concern is more about the comfort and stress relief of food and not being hungry. I am still drinking coffee with some creamer and powerade. From the previous post and from other research, it does seem that could make insulin levels go up, but I don’t think it would be the same as a eating a small or even a big meal. It might make a difference in the real numbers, but to me, the question is how much of a difference? I started at 323 in November. This morning I was 292. I have been fasting in the sense of not eating food, but I am drinking things that are sweet and less the 30 calories per cup. Given up coffee would have to be only it there was no other choice. The goal was two pounds a week, I will continue with the current style of fasting I am doing and collect more numbers. Then later I will switch to water only fasting and see how that effects results.

I am hoping this standing desk treadmill has a big impact. The gym has been an important step, but I would do more if I had the time, but I have to be at my computer. This is a way of dealing with that problem.
 
I will be 40 this year and I’ve have a pretty bad weight problem for the last 12 years or so. In the middle of November 2023 I maxed out at 323 pounds. I have finally got to a place where I can go to the gym regularly. By cutting my diet to down to less than a 1000 calories a day and doing crossfit 3 to 4 times a week I am down to 300 today. I have set a loose two pound per week goal, but I am just barely making it and I am eating almost nothing. I have a garmin watch to monitor my heart rate and it also it always telling me that I need to get moving and that I am not getting enough steps. I work from home so there is not even walking around an office. As I have to be at my computer at 8 hours a day and I live in Maine and it is winter, walking is not much of an option. Today I ordered a standing desk and a walking treadmill to go under it. My plan is to set it up next to my normal desk and then buy three new monitor and mirror the signal to my existing three monitor. So in theory I could now walk 8 hours a day. The treadmill I bought said it had a max speed of 3.8 mph I think. I guess my question is does anybody have an experience with these standing desk walking treadmill combinations? Anybody that has started in the 300 pound range like me? The fact is to loose the 20 pounds I did with crossfit was hard in the sense that I had to eat almost nothing the whole time. I actually like the exercise its self, but the numbers are not happening fast enough. I have not had a chance to ask a doctor what they think, but I do think something is wrong because this is such a slow process.
Sounds like you were in almost exactly my situation a few years ago..
I was 6'1" 300lbs Type2, on 3 diabetes meds including insulin, and on 2 high blood pressure meds.

The solution is a low-carb (preferably keto) diet.
I've had to go full-on Carnivore with as close to zero carbs as I can, but I am now down to 173lbs and off ALL meds with perfect blood pressure as well. (with little to no change in exercise levels - mostly no exercise)

I have a YouTube playlist that shows most of the research I followed to get to this point.
The whole "energy" model of calories-in vs calories-out is bunk science, proven completely wrong by all the actual science since 2007. Since 2020, we've learned that vegetable (seed oils) are the root cause of metabolic syndrome due to the way it damages the electron transport in the mitochondria.

Also, buy a good glucose/keto meter, and do lots of labs, and keep track of your data!

My playlist:
 
I will be 40 this year and I’ve have a pretty bad weight problem for the last 12 years or so.... I have finally got to a place where I can go to the gym regularly. By cutting my diet to down to less than a 1000 calories a day and doing crossfit 3 to 4 times a week I am down to 300 today. I have set a loose two pound per week goal, but I am just barely making it and I am eating almost nothing.

Just thinking out loud: You haven't really been at it that long, if I'm reading you correctly you've been going to the gym for around 3 months. Generally, when someone begins an exercise program (especially one that includes weight training) after an extended period without one, he will experience significant physiological changes--rapid muscle growth and so on--that tends to drop off after a time (~3-6 months). Then he experiences the "plateau" where no gains seem to be being made. That's when many quit!
Why I mention this is that if you've just begun weight training (Cross-fit), you might be getting some significant muscle growth and that might be skewing your weight loss calculations. You are likely replacing fat with muscle.
I'm not going to offer any sort of specific diet advice beyond saying that 1000 cal. per day seems unsustainable and that you should make sure that you're getting enough nourishment. (Years ago, Steve did a series on the Keto diet. But, I'm not endorsing that approach either.) Medical advice is probably a good idea.
I know a lot of people (here especially) really like to dig into the science and employ whatever gadget that's available, but I'm skeptical. I'm more a believer in the slow and study, nutrition, lifestyle, weight training as well as cardio, high intensity interval training (if appropriate), mental health ... but if the tech helps, use it. (I use a wheelchair, so I can't speak to the treadmill directly, but it sounds like a good idea ... just don't fall off and end up in a wheelchair! joke) Remember, you didn't gain that weight overnight, so don't expect to lose it overnight either.
Avoid gurus and magic potions, but some guys like Jeff Cavalier (you mentioned Huberman, so you probably know of him too) are worth listening to, at least to a point.
 
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I have had some results with eating less and moving more, but not to the level I want. So far as getting my insulin levels lower, I am wondering if there is some way I can check my insulin level through out the day. If I am sure that my levels have been low then that will make me feel better. Now it is 3:34pm in the afternoon and I got up about 8:30am. I have had nothing but coffee and powerade zero which is sugar free and zero calories today. I am wondering what my insulin levels are currently. Also what the units would be and what the unit should be for what you are taking about. One problem is that I what really have a hard time giving up coffee. Most days I don’t mind going a long time without food, at least I have gotten into a place where I am ok with it, but giving up coffee would be very hard for me. I just bought the Fast Feast Repeat audio book on audible and starting listening, so maybe that will help. I also have been listening to some of the Andrew Huberman podcasts, which I did listen to one on fasting and I think it was recommended. Thanks.
From what I have read, getting into ketosis means your body will burn fat because the sugars in your blood are exhausted as an energy supply. You can purchase ketosis strips online which measure the amount of ketones in your urine, an indicator you're burning fat, not sugar.
 
Well I am looking to create positive vibes. I did finally get to spend about four hours on my Windows Kernel Programming course, which is not this thread. For this thread I just wanted to update that as of the this morning I am at 271. I am getting close to being under 270 and then after that I will get below 260. I did try jogging out side a few days ago but I think I am being a bit of a baby about it. I guess I am inside my own head a bit much for physical exertion. I guess a person that has been as inactive as I have their body and brain might be connected where not much is demanded of their body. I still don’t have the nutrition right, but I don’t really have the carvings I once did. In fact the thought has occurred to me that I would like it better if I did not have to eat at all. That is a change from how I once interacted with food. Since I do have to eat at least some, I have had the through that maybe I should think about food as a “medical requirement” and figure out exact what my body needs and eat no more. That would be wonderful. As far as the walking treadmill, I can’t seem to use it well while I am on my computer, my weight loss lately has been because of CrossFit and I am by no means very good at it. But as naive as I am about how to exercise, I am find as long as I show up and try it seems to be working. 166 days, 323 to 271.
 
... as long as I show up and try it seems to be working.
Thanks for the update. I'd been wondering how you were making out. You're approaching the 6 month mark and it sounds like you're well on your way. There are a number of different ways to improve the 'mind muscle' connection, everything from specialized bodybuilding exercises, like for example concentration curls, to various yoga and tai chi techniques. But honestly, like everything else in life, practice makes perfect. Just keep doing.