Resolved Boot problem

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CSharpe

Member
Oct 2, 2020
7
3
Hi all,

I just tried ReadSpeed on my second computer and it is having problem. The first USB port I tried got to the ReadSpeed splash screen but the keyboard did not work. So I switched USB ports and it didn't boot at all.

Any troubleshooting tips?
 
I just tried another computer with the same motherboard. I had the same issue with the keyboard until I moved the USB receiver - then it worked.
I'll try it on the on the original computer.
 
My BIOS has a low-power boot option which doesn't enable the extra/USB 3.0 ports until after the disk-based OS requests them after loading, so I had to enable the USB ports from power-on in order to be able to use the F12 Boot Menu USB boot functionality on my Gigabyte mainboard. Prior to that, the boot menu would show the USB drive in the list of devices to boot from but would skip booting from the USB drive and boot to Windows, but "ejecting it" would fail, saying it was in use. Enabling all USB devices in the BIOS from power-on made it work correctly for me. The next thing I would have tried would have been plugging it into one of the USB 2 ports on the back of the PC.
 
@CSharpe is your keyboard wireless? Do you know what kind of port it was connected to? ie USB3+?
Yes it is a wireless keyboard. I have 2 legacy ports in the back for keyboard. I can only plug one device in or the keyboard does not work. I do not have ports available in the front - like the other machine (different type of case). I may have to try and make a CD.
 
Some BIOSes do not support USB keyboards, and some only support them on USB 2 (or USB 1.1 if your machine is that old.) These ports are normally black as opposed to blue, red, yellow or other colours. I have a machine that REQUIRES an old style PS/2 connected keyboard (non-USB) to work at all in the BIOS.
 
My BIOS has a low-power boot option which doesn't enable the extra/USB 3.0 ports until after the disk-based OS requests them after loading, so I had to enable the USB ports from power-on in order to be able to use the F12 Boot Menu USB boot functionality on my Gigabyte mainboard. Prior to that, the boot menu would show the USB drive in the list of devices to boot from but would skip booting from the USB drive and boot to Windows, but "ejecting it" would fail, saying it was in use. Enabling all USB devices in the BIOS from power-on made it work correctly for me. The next thing I would have tried would have been plugging it into one of the USB 2 ports on the back of the PC.
ReadSpeed boots from the USB 3.0 port - the keyboard does not want to work - no matter which port I plug it into. The case of this PC does not have any ports in the front - it's a really old case (early 90's) as it has 2 floppy drive bays.
 
@CSharpe is your keyboard wireless? Do you know what kind of port it was connected to? ie USB3+?
It is a wireless keyboard. The front port are USB 2.0 - 2 separate wires. The keyboard did not work in the back so I moved it to the front and it worked. The other PC does not have any front ports available.
 
the keyboard does not want to work - no matter which port I plug it
It may not supply enough power for the wireless dongle to work, OR it may be the case that your BIOS *only* works with old style keyboards (non-USB.) Look for one of the purple/green ports on the back to see if it has those. That won't help if you don't have a keyboard to plug into it though.
 
It may not supply enough power for the wireless dongle to work, OR it may be the case that your BIOS *only* works with old style keyboards (non-USB.) Look for one of the purple/green ports on the back to see if it has those. That won't help if you don't have a keyboard to plug into it though.
The keyboard works fine without ReadSpeed. It only stops working if I boot ReadSpeed.
 
The keyboard works fine without ReadSpeed
Yes, because it's being driven by Windows drivers. ReadSpeed runs under DOS which relies on BIOS as the drivers for the keyboard. The question is whether the BIOS will drive a USB keyboard. If it does not (and it appears yours doesn't) then DOS can't do anything more than the BIOS will allow. Try resetting the machine, pressing whatever key would get you into the BIOS. If you can't get into your BIOS (or can get in but can't do anything else) then it's a sign the keyboard is never going to work for DOS either.