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Anyone have their CompTIA A+ Certification? Could Use Some Pointers.

#1

DesignatedJ02

DesignatedJ02

I am sticking this in the hardware section here due to this being somewhat hardware related.
Does anyone have their CompTIA A+ Certification?

I am a college student, in a Junior College at the moment, working to transfer to a Uni and pursue my Computer Science degree with a focus in Cyber Security. I have been looking at certifications and from what I gather the A+ is a good starting point. I've ordered a book that has been recommended by a good amount of people and have purchased Mike Meyer's A+ Udemy courses for Exam 1 and Exam 2.
Besides that, does anyone have any advice or pointers for studying for the exam? I'm pretty solid when it comes to the software side of things. But Hardware and Networking are the parts where I am weaker.

I plan on going from A+ -> Network+ -> Security+. To start.

Thanks!


#2

P

PHolder

I have a BCS and no certifications, but I have been out of the job hunting part of the field for some time. It's always been my belief that someone with a CS degree is already capable enough of any computer task required, but usually these people are designing software. I personally don't think certifications such as A+ help with software design at all. My experience was always people who didn't get a university degree were the ones who need certifications to get jobs. My previous former employer would not hire anyone without the equivalent of a CS degree, and exhibited a preference for those with a MCS for the most serious roles.

So, if you're serious about wanting to design software, I would recommend you do the free programming course CS50 from HarvardX via EdX.

If you're more interested in the security aspects of things, I just saw this, which comes in two flavours, free and a certificate if paid:


#3

DesignatedJ02

DesignatedJ02

I have a BCS and no certifications, but I have been out of the job hunting part of the field for some time. It's always been my belief that someone with a CS degree is already capable enough of any computer task required, but usually these people are designing software. I personally don't think certifications such as A+ help with software design at all. My experience was always people who didn't get a university degree were the ones who need certifications to get jobs. My previous former employer would not hire anyone without the equivalent of a CS degree, and exhibited a preference for those with a MCS for the most serious roles.

So, if you're serious about wanting to design software, I would recommend you do the free programming course CS50 from HarvardX via EdX.

If you're more interested in the security aspects of things, I just saw this, which comes in two flavours, free and a certificate if paid:

I am more interested in the security aspect of things. I will take a look at that program you gave. Thank you!


#4

P

PHXdNelson

In my opinion, the A+ is good info to learn, but I would not spend the money on the cert. Self study, pass a practice test and move forward with your goals. Using certs as an example to help build a roadmap of knowledge, I' agree with your plan (" A+ -> Network+ -> Security+ "). Again knowledge only, don't bother getting the certs. If you are in the USA and on the east coast with a desire to be a government contractor, I've heard (a few years ago) that the Sec+ is an HR must. That would be the only reason to actually get that cert IMO.